Monday, July 21, 2014

Stephanie Lynn Wilson's SILK STOCKINGS AND A BIBLE 8/27 (NYC)

Stephanie Lynn Wilson

AFTER A SUCCESSFUL SOLD OUT PERFORMANCE OF PLAY #1 TITLED "THE GRINDER" WE'RE BACK WITH PLAY #2! 

SILK STOCKINGS AND A BIBLE, THE SECOND PLAY IN THE TRILOGY "WOMEN YOU THOUGHT YOU KNEW," ABOUT WOMEN PERCEIVED AS SOCIETY'S "BAD GIRLS", IS SET IN HARLEM AND ATLANTIC CITY DURING THE SWING ERA. IT TELLS THE TALE OF FANNIE MAE BROWN, A CHORUS GIRL WHO BECOMES A CHURCH LADY WITH A PAST...

ARE HER REGRETS OF HER SPICY PAST OR OF HER AUSTERE PRESENT?


WRITTEN, DIRECTED, PRODUCED BY STEPHANIE LYNN WILSON 
STARRING KRYSTAL HILL AS GIRL FANNIE MAE BROWN 
STACEY GRIFFIN AS THE SAILOR JOSEPH CHARLES 
MICHELLE ROBINSON AS DORIS 
LASALLE CHUK OBASI AS BUDDY 
EREN T. GIBSON AS SASSY AND 
 SANTI RODRIGUEZ AS SAMMY G. 

$25 in advance/$30 at door 
For more information and to buy tickets, please click here.
~~~~~~~~~~ 
A scene from this play was chosen to be performed at the 2014 Harlem Arts Festival

Look for the full production of all three plays 
in the same run of the entire trilogy in early 2015! 

The staged reading of the third play in the trilogy "Wild Child" TBA 
Follow @trilogyofwomen on Twitter 

WILSON EXCLUSIVE TALENT PRODUCTIONS IS FISCALLY SPONSORED BY MEGA NATIONAL ARTS ORGANIZATION FRACTURED ATLAS

Monday, July 14, 2014

Khalil Kain to star in Nathan James' "Contrary to Popular Belief" reading TONIGHT (NYC)


Tonight!  July 14, 2014    7:30pm  
The Cell Theater
(338 W. 23rd Street b/t 8th and 9th Avenues)


The cast list is in for Nathan James' full length play, Contrary to Popular Belief, at The Black Board Reading series: Khalil Kain (well known for GIRLFRIENDS and JUICE), Toccarra Cash, James Edward Becton III, Carter Woodson, Norman Small, Mckenzie Frye, Evander Duck, and Ryan Guess. 

Synopsis:
On the South side of Pittsburgh, there is a business district that’s stretches along East Carson Street, which is home to shop owner, Kevin Evans, who struggles to keep his life together amidst his estranged brother missing in New Orleans and a failing marriage.  Contrary to Popular Belief is a play about love, betrayal, regret, and forgiveness surrounding the controversial events of the Hurricane Katrina disaster.  The play is set in Kevin’s shop, Debonair’s, in the fall of 2005 in the critical hours of the warning to evacuate New Orleans.  In the midst of this national disaster the characters in this play must find a way to cope as they also deal with going through the storms in their personal lives.  With the revealing of dark family secrets, infidelity, and the threat a Debonair’s license to operate being revoked, Kevin and the shop employees take us on a journey through their personal storms as they struggle to keep their head above water to survive. Contrary to Popular belief explores the causes of the unaddressed stress levels causing hyper tension for many African Americans, questions the government, and addresses the domino effect racism has played on the state of many black communities today.

Written by Nathan James
Directed by Cezar Williams
Stage directions are being read by Stori Ayers .

Come out to the Cell Theater on July 14th at 7:30 pm. More information at: 
www.blackboardplays.com

Monday, July 7, 2014

8-More African-Born Writers You Should Be Reading

A. Igoni Barrett
Fiction can be a revealing window into cultures that are unfamiliar to us — and reading the work of an author who lives in another country or was born across the world from us can elucidate a different point of view. Whether it be a country’s political situation, the lexicon, the history, or the people, immersing oneself in the fiction of a specific nation, region, or even an entire content can provide an opportunity to better understand other places and experiences. And, as a recent New York Times article noted, this is an especially great time for literature from Africa and by authors who were born there:
The flowering of new African writers is “an amazing phenomenon,” said Manthia Diawara, a professor of comparative literature and film at New York University. “It is a literature more about being a citizen of the world — going to Europe, going back to Lagos,” he said. “Now we are talking about how the West relates to Africa and it frees writers to create their own worlds. They have several identities and they speak several languages.”
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Helen Oyeyemi, Ishmael Beah, NoViolet Bulawayo, and other African-born writers who have experienced success in America are all cited, including Lagos-born Teju Cole, who took to Twitter to point out something the article touches on a bit, but that deserves extra emphasis: “too many literary publishers would rather put out work by writers from Africa than work by African-Americans because in the current climate the Africans are considered more appealing for what is seen as a ‘black slot.’”
As that very necessary conversation — about a sad reality that the publishing world needs to address immediately — continues, the fact remains that an abundance of fantastic literature is coming out of Africa right now. That’s something to celebrate, so to help you do that, we offer a few other suggestions of African-born writers whose work you should seek out.
To continue reading, please click here.

Friday, July 4, 2014

Heather Bagnall's singlemarriedgirl gets its NYC debut at The Spiral Theatre Studio 7/18-21


As The Spiral Theatre Studio comes to the end of its first year, it is excited to present a New York City debut, when Heather Bagnall and her company, Tasty Monster Productions, bring Heather's one woman show singlemarriedgirl to the Big Apple. Check out the performance details on the website here

Saturday, June 28, 2014

Theatre & Bigotry


It's like something out of Kafka.

While I am sure that most artists and creators of theatre are extremely compassionate when it comes to the world at large, I encounter more bigotry on a daily basis in the arena of the theatre than in any other place in my life.

First of all there is the "Protestant Ascendancy" of New York. While there are certainly plenty of NYC theatre folks who have plenty of respect for theatre in the rest of the country, there are still far too many decision makers who believe that NYC is THE validator of theatre. It's bigotry to think that theatre in Cleveland or Atlanta can't be the equal of theatre in NYC.

And outside of New York, how often do you hear the lament that the theatre is very "cliquish" in this or that city. And it's true. And the problem with cliques - just by their very nature - is that they spew bigotry and they spew it into the greater community, which undermines the theatre as a whole.Cliquishness is not good for the mental health of the community and It does NOT build a population of Americans who are going to get excited about the theatre.

There's also economic bigotry as well - those who get the grants are the "chosen." They are the ones that get ALL of the local press in so many cities, making it almost impossible for the independent and unfunded artists and projects in a community to get the attention they deserve.  

Unfortunately there is more talent than there is money. Please don't hold that against the artists who are not allowed to get in line for the money.

Bigotry towards community theatre is ridiculous. Most of us got our start in community theatre. Every community theatre out there is just as much a blessing to Broadway as Broadway is to community theatre.

Personally I find the attitude towards university theatre to be very bigoted. This is the most vital theatre that there is and all of us in the theatre should be encouraging our friends and fans to enjoy what happens on university and college theat
re stages. That's where you are going to see Chekov and Brecht and not just Shakespeare.

I won't even go there with the situation as far as African American playwrights goes. Or ageism.

And nowadays, more and more, there is a level of producers who is neither commercial nor community and who are not eligible for the 501(c)3 nonprofit status who are struggling to fulfill their artistic destinies. These folks should be our heroes - not shunted off in to dark corners.

Talent is NOT a geographical phenomenon - an act of theatre is only as valuable as the effect it has on an audience at any given performance.

Jaz Dorsey
Dramaturg/e
The Actors Reading Room

Nashville, Tennessee

Sunday, June 1, 2014

Martin Halpern's NO MOVES BACK at The Spiral Theatre Studio June 13-30 (NYC)



This will be the fourth play in the Spiral's Salt & Pepper Series

In an out-of the-way corner of Brooklyn’s Prospect Park, Morrie and Alan, two retired Jewish classical musicians in their seventies, are playing one of many chess matches they have played over their long friendship. But Morrie has sunk into a deep depression, and has lost all interest in the game, in his music, and in life itself. Alan, a determined optimist, tries to pull Morrie out of his depression, but with little success. 

Into this situation come five other characters who affect them in contrasting ways. 

By the end of the play, all the other characters having departed, Morrie and Alan are left to reflect on these encounters and on their future relationship. What they arrive at, after a struggle, is a new beginning, in which Morrie will work his way toward enjoying both chess and music again in the company of his life-long, life-affirming friend. 

To learn more about the cast, the Spiral Theatre Studio, and to buy tickets, please click here.

AEA Showcase with : Peter Levine*, William Shuman , Amanda Gae Miller, Joseph Monge, Yanelba Roldan, Clover St. Claire, *Appearing courtesy of Actor's Equity

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Maya Angelou: 1928-2014


Still, I Rise
by
Maya Angelou

You may write me down in history
With your bitter, twisted lies,
You may trod me in the very dirt
But still, like dust, I'll rise.

Does my sassiness upset you?
Why are you beset with gloom?
'Cause I walk like I've got oil wells
Pumping in my living room.

Just like moons and like suns,
With the certainty of tides,
Just like hopes springing high,
Still I'll rise.

Did you want to see me broken?
Bowed head and lowered eyes?
Shoulders falling down like teardrops,
Weakened by my soulful cries?

Does my haughtiness offend you?
Don't you take it awful hard
'Cause I laugh like I've got gold mines
Diggin' in my own backyard.

You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
You may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I'll rise.

Does my sexiness upset you?
Does it come as a surprise
That I dance like I've got diamonds
At the meeting of my thighs?

Out of the huts of history's shame
I rise
Up from a past that's rooted in pain
I rise
I'm a black ocean, leaping and wide,
Welling and swelling I bear in the tide.

Leaving behind nights of terror and fear
I rise
Into a daybreak that's wondrously clear
I rise
Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave,
I am the dream and the hope of the slave.
I rise
I rise
I rise.

For a wonderful multi-media bio on the great woman, please click here.
Image/poem source here

Thursday, May 8, 2014

Call for Historical Female Minority Screenplays

Kidding Productions
Seeking Writer for an Historical Female Minority Project 

We are looking for a writer to bring on board an existing project. The project is a biopic about an historical female minority figure set during the period of Emancipation. As such, we are ONLY looking for scripts about female minority characters or historical figures as writing samples to evaluate in this potential writer-hire opportunity. When pitching, please tell us a little about yourself and your background and why you're the right writer for such a project.

Budget has yet to be determined. Both WGA and Non-WGA writers may submit.

We are an established theatrical/stage show production company moving into film and television, and we already have name talent interested in the story.

To submit to this lead:
Please type "InkTip" into the subject of the email, and submit a logline & synopsis (followed by a resume if you choose to do so) in the body of the email. (No email attachments, those emails will be deleted without being read) to Josh Berg at: kiddingscript (at) aol.com

NOTE: access to InkTip is restricted to producers who already have some track record in the feature film world; however, we realize that every producer who got a feature off the ground had to find that first script somewhere. So, we offer "e-mail only" leads to up-and-coming producers who show strong potential and who provided good references in an effort to help our writers connect with such producers.

NOTE: Please only submit your work if it fits what the lead is looking for exactly. If you aren't sure if your script fits, please ask InkTip first. 

InkTip.com is a service screenwriters PAY for. In this case, it's a freebie. To join InkTip for weekly email calls for screenplays, please click here. Remember, only submit if you have what the producer is looking for. And mention InkTip.

Good luck,
AAPEX

Monday, May 5, 2014

5 Days left to see Marcus Gardley's THE HOUSE THAT WILL NOT STAND at Yale Rep



For more information and to buy tickets please click here.

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

The Spiral Theatre Studio Summer Workshop


Artistic Director Paula J Riley will be offering an 8-week summer workshop for writers, directors, and actors at Manhattan's most innovative studio from May 26th through June 18th. Five writers and five directors will choose their cast from 15 actors for a 30-minute one-act play. Costs: Actors $500.00, Writers and Directors $600.00. For more information, please contact Paula directly at paula@pjrileystudios.com